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Gene Twaronite Posts

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Birth of a Poem

One day, I sat in a dentist’s waiting room, hopeless staring at the blank page of my journal when out of the void words started to appear …

Here’s their story. Watch here

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The Stuff of Poetry

Many people tend to equate poetry with supposedly more important things like love, war, pestilence, racial injustice, environmental destruction, death and despair, to name a few. Yet poems can be literally about anything. In his poem “Evening,” Richard Aldington simply wrote about doing the dishes, Ezra Pound, in his poem “In a Station of the Metro,” focuses on the faces of commuters in the Paris Metro. In her book Tender Buttons, Gertrude Stein wrote a series of prose poems about everyday objects, food, and rooms. And of course there’s Wordsworth and his daffodils. But while the poem may start out with the mundane, how the poet chooses to deal with it makes all the difference.

Here is my take on this subject, from my collection The Museum of Unwearable Shoes, which you can view in this new video

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A Stubborn Old Pangolin

There once was a stubborn old pangolin

who insisted on playing the mandolin.

Some critics called it noise.

Some claimed it destroys

the ozone, so bad it’s a mortal sin.

Follow more of my short poems on Instagram (genetwaronitepoetry).

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Now on Instagram

Poets are now using Instagram more than ever to reach out to their readers, so I thought I might give it a try. So you can now follow more of my work here https://www.instagram.com/genetwaronitepoetry/

Hope to see you soon. Your comments, questions, and feedback are always welcome. Like all art, poetry is a two-way street, so I’ll try to respond to every comment.

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Plea for an Imaginary Amphibian

A line from a poem or story can often inspire a poem. In this case, it was a line from the poet W.S. Merwin, which got me thinking on what is real and what is not. As is often the case, this led me to another line from the poem “Poetry” by Marianne Moore: “imaginary gardens with real toads in them.” Wait a second. How can an imaginary garden have real toads? Wouldn’t the toad also be imaginary? But what Moore was trying to say, I think, is that good poetry uses imagination to create a world that can seem just as real to us as physical reality. And good fiction does the same. I know that Middle Earth is not real, but it will always be a place I carry within me. Anyway, here is my new poem for the New Year. May your coming year by filled with imagination and wonder.

(Note: I’m not a big fan of intrusive Subscribe buttons or popups. Please use the contact page to enter your name and email address to receive occasional posts.)

Plea for an Imaginary Amphibian

“but nothing is real/until it can be sold”
W.S. Merwin, “”Journey”

What is the price of the Milky Way?
Think of a number.
Any day now black holes
will be sold like donuts
and dark matter
the ultimate investment opportunity.

Just imagine an alternate universe
that could be yours.
Everything is on the table,
even the things we thought were
non-negotiable.

But can we not keep some creatures
from this marketplace?
Let us keep at least our
imaginary friends and toads.

First published in NewMyths https://sites.google.com/newmyths.com/newmyths56-2021/issue-5657-stories/plea-for-an-imaginary-amphibian

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Welcome

Welcome to my new website where I plan to share some of my poems as well as a few of the things I’ve learned along the way in my own poetic journey. Please use the contact page to enter your name and email address to receive occasional posts.

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